Recent Fire Damage Posts

10 Tips to Prevent House Fires

6/28/2021 (Permalink)

House fires take lives and homes of too many people! In a five year period house fires have caused 2,620 dealths and 6.9 billion in prperty damage. The top three causes of fires in a home are cooking, heating equipment, and electrical malfunction. Here are some tips to help prevent a fire from occurring.

1. Test your smoke alarms regularly

2. Inspect all your heating sources

3. Keep your stove and oven clean

4. DO NOT leave your kitchen while cooking

5. Always check your dryer

6. Maintain all cords

7. Properly store flammable products

8. Practice caution with candles

9. Be careful with your fireplace 

10. Keep fire extinguishers around

If you you have questions or would like more information on fire prevention give SERVPRO of Coos, Curry, & Del Norte Counties a call (541)808-2600.

Statistics and Facts You Should Know about House Fires

6/28/2021 (Permalink)

Key insights + statistics

  • In a five-year period, house fires caused 2,620 deaths and 6.9 billion in prperty damage (NFPA).
  • In 2018, the national average was 2.5 civilian fire dealths and 9.8 injuries per 1,000 fires (NFDR).
  • The top three cases of fires in homes are cooking, heating equipment, and electrical malfunction (FEMA).
  • It can take just 30 seconds for a small flame to turn into a major blaze (Department of Homeland Security).
  • An average of 358,500 homes experience a structural fire each year (NFPA).
  • More than 3,000 Americans die in fires each year (FEMA).
  • Everyday, at least one child dies from a fire inside the home (Stanford Children's Hospital). 

Take extra care when making dinner; cooking is the leading cause of house fires in the nation. Additionally caused by faulty heating equipment and electrical malfunction, each year ther's an average of 358,000 house fires according to the National Fire Protection Association. These fires result in 7 dealths everyday. 

What causes house fires? -The facts

The following data comes from the U.S. Fire Administration, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), FEMA, and Ready.gov:

  • The top three causes of residential fries are cooking (50% of all fires), heating equipment (12.5%), and electrical malfunction (6.3%).
  • A house fire happens every 87 seconds.
  • Over 22% of non-residential fires are electrical fires, caused by short circuits or wiring problems. 
  • Thanksgiving is the peak day for cooking fires.
  • NFPA reports that close to 30% of fires start in homes.
  • Each year over 18,000 fires are started due to fireworks.
  • In less than 5 minutes, the heat from a house fire can reach over 1100 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • 45% of home fires in the fall months when most Americans use their fireplaces to keep warm.
  • 96% of all homes in the United States have had some form of fire or somke-related damage.
  • According to Stanford Children's Hospital, of the children hospitalized for burns, 20% of children under age 4 are treated for contact burns. 

If you have fire damage to your home or would like more information on fire prevention give SERVPRO of Coos, Curry, & Del Norte Counties a call (541)808-2600.

Smoke and Soot Cleanup

6/7/2021 (Permalink)

Smoke and soot is very invasive and can penetrate various cavities within your home, causing hidden damages and odors. Our smoke damage expertise and experience allows us to inspect and accurately assess the extent of the damages to develop a comprehensive plan of action. 

Smoke and Soot Facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.

There are two different types of smoke-wet and dry. As a result, there are differant types of soot residue after a fire. Before resturation begins, SERVPRO of Coos, Curry, & Del Norte Counties will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke-Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, stickey, or smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.

Dry Smoke-Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, also heat rises therefore smoke rises.

Protein Fire Residue-Produced by Evaporation of Material Rather Than From Fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, and extreme pungent odor.

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a litte different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions. We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your smoke and fire damage property. 

If you have any questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage give SERVPRO of Coos, Curry, & Del Norte Counties a Call (541)808-2600.

Preventing Fire Damage

5/5/2021 (Permalink)

Here are some helpful tips on preventing fire from damaging your home or business.

Within 30 feet from your home or business

  • Clear combustible materials such as dried leaves and pine needles.
  • Cut down tree limbs that are 15 feet or closer to the ground. This will help prevent the fire from spreading onto your properties tree line.
  • Remove any vines or vegetation that is on the side of your house or business.
  • Place any flammable lawn furniture in storage when not in use.
  • Opt for non-flammable decor, such as gravel opposed to wood chips.

Within 100 to 30 Feet From Your Home or Business

  • Create "fuel breaks" in your property. Hopefully these areas will help stop the spread of a fire. These can be gravel pathways or driveways.
  • Cut any tree branches that are 8 feet or closer to the ground.
  • Clear combustible vegetation.

Within 200 to 100 Feet From Your Home or Business

  • Place any stacked firewood or scrap wood.
  • Continue to clear combustible vegetation.
  • Plant trees far enough apart so their branches don't touch.

Fire Prevention

5/4/2021 (Permalink)

If a fire starts in your home you may have as little as 2 minutes to escape , but with proper preparedness, you can help keep your family safe. Fire safety measure include those that are intended to prevent ignition of an uncontrolled fire and those that are used to limit the development and effects after a fire has started. Smoke and fire alarms that are properly installed and maintained are very important in reducing fire, deaths, and injuries. Having properly installed and maintained home fire sprinklers can reduce the heat, flames, and smoke produced in a fire. Portable fire extinguishers can save lives and property by putting out small fires or at least containing them until help can arrive. Carbon monoxided (CO) alarms should be placed in your home with at least one fuel burning appliance/heater, attached garage, or fireplace to detect this odorless, colorless gas that is often refured to as the invisible killer. 

If you have a fire damaged property give SERVPRO of Coos, Curry, & Del Norte Counties a call and well be there to help. (541)808-2600 

Summer Time is Almost Here

4/30/2021 (Permalink)

Summer is time to enjoy the outside, but it is important to have safe outdoor practices also. Here are some tips from the National Fire Protection Association.

  • When using a charcoal grill, only use starter fluid designed for BBQ's; do not add fluid after coals are lit.
  • When using a gas grill, ensure the hose connection is tight; check the hose for leaks. Applying soapy water to the hose will easily and safely reveal any leaks.
  • When camping always use a flame retardent tent and set up camp far away from the campfire. 
  • Always build a campfire down wind from the tent area. Clear any tall grass or vegetation and dig a pit before building your fire. Extinguish the fire before going to sleep or leaving the campsite.
  • Store liquid fire starters away from your tent and campfire, and only use dry kindling to start or freshen your campfire.

It's not quite summer yet but we here at SERVPRO of Coos, Curry, & Del Norte Counties wish you a safe and happy summer!

Residential Fire Damage in Empire, OR

6/11/2020 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Coos Curry & Del Norte Counties can help with any size disaster.

Recently, SERVPRO of Coos helped a family in need when their family home was damaged in the middle of the night. We were able to bring this home back to preloss condition in 5 weeks!

The home owner was extremely happy with us, she lived out of town during the time of the damage. We were able to facilitate the entire project with the insurance company so she was not burden any more during this challenging time for our nation.

If you have a fire damage and need material removal or soot removal for soot damage, we are here to help 24/7.

Call us at 541-808-2600 for more information on our process and specific services.

Local Awareness for Fire Damage in the Summer

6/11/2020 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Coos, Curry & Del Norte Counties would like to spread local awareness on BBQ's or smokers in or next to structures:

SERVPRO recently assisted with the fire damage caused by a smoker that was on the exterior wooden porch.

We would like to remind our community that these type of structures are not able to handle the heat often caused by a smoker or barbeque.

We urge you to move the barbeque out to an open area away from structures, tall grass, or out buildings when in use. Flames can often get much higher than one anticipates causing severe damages, so please have a water hose within reach, and check with local fire departments for permission.

SERVPRO of Coos, Curry & Del Norte Counties

1640 Maple Street Suite B

North Bend, Oregon 97459

541-808-2600

2020 Increase in Local House Fires

6/9/2020 (Permalink)

Coos County House Fires

SERVPRO has seen an increase in residential fires this year, and we want to share some causes with our community to spread awareness:

Unattended Candles -

When candles are left unattended they can cause a fire multiple ways. We want to encourage our community to put out any candles in rooms that are not currently occupied.

Unattended Cooking - 

When ranges or ovens are left unattended we are risking a potential fire to break out. Splashing oil, burned foods, or even unseen substances are extremely flammable. Any time you are cooking we recommend not leaving the kitchen unsupervised as these things can happen in a matter of seconds.

Unattended campfires - 

Campfires or burn barrels should be 50+ ft away from any surrounding structures. Wind can carry flames causing damage to nearby structures. Please do not build fires near any structures.

If you would like more information please call us at 541-808-2600, we are happy to help at SERVPRO of Coos, Curry & Del Norte Counties.

Tips to Prevent Fire Damage/Loss

12/11/2019 (Permalink)

Tips to prevent fire damage/loss at your home:

-Regularly check your smoke alarms to ensure that they are working properly.

-Inspect your heating sources and ensure they are properly working/cleaned.

-Never leave anything cooking unattended in your kitchen, it takes just a few seconds for a fire to break out.

-Keep the oven/stove clear and clean all the time. Stove-tops/ovens don't randomly combust. Fires are usually caused by leftover food particles that haven't been cleaned from the area.

-Check your dryer. Always ensure that your dryer connections are secure and the lint filter is always cleaned.

-Know the location of your power shutoffs for all utilities while also knowing the power shutoffs for gas lines, appliances, circuit breakers, and fuses.

-Maintain your electrical cords. If any cords are frayed or damaged, make sure to repair or replace immediately.

-Keep fire extinguishers handy at all times.

Steps That Can Be Helpful After a House Fire

12/11/2019 (Permalink)

Some steps that can be helpful after a house fire has happened to you:

-Before returning into your residence, ensure with your local fire department that it is safe to go back into your residence.

-Ask for a copy of the fire report. This gives you time/date, area affected, and ignition of the fire, if officials are able to determine the source.

-Call your insurance company and begin the claim process.

-Make a list of damaged items/goods at earliest ability to do so.

-Call all utility providers and inform them on the fire.

-Contact your local police department to ensure that your property remains safe while in your absence. Empty homes, even fire damaged ones, can be attractive locations for squatters and looters.

-Call SERVPRO of Coos, Curry, and Del Norte Counties at (541)808–2600, available 24/7, 365 days a year – to discuss fire restoration services.

Smoke Damage to 1800 Victorian Style Home

11/27/2019 (Permalink)

Unattended Cooking results in grease fire.

This affected a beautiful, 2 story Victorian style house from the late 1800s. 

The homeowner was seriously concerned with salvaging all original materials, as most of the building materials are original.

SERVPRO of Coos, Curry & Del Norte Counties was able to just that by dry cleaning the interior surfaces and deodorizing the porous materials.

This home had extensive wall hangings and keepsakes that were cleaned on-site, while some belongings were moved out of the area to be cleaned. 

This heomeowner was very happy with our team, our rapid response, and positive "can-do" attitude about all aspects of the project. 

Call SERVPRO of Coos, Curry & Del Norte Counties today at (541) 808-2600 to discuss what the best approach is for your home. 

California & Oregon Wildfires - Prepare Yourself

5/14/2019 (Permalink)

When wildfire takes control of your life, we help you take it back. 

Tips from FEMA for preparing your family, home, and business from the threat of wildfires:

  • Get an emergency supply kit, which includes items like non-perishable foods, water, a battery-powered or hand crank radio, extra flashlights and batteries. You may want to prepare a portable kit and keep it ijn your car. 
  • Make a family emergency plan. Your family may not be together when a disaster strikes, so it is important to know how you will contact one another, how you will get back together and what you will do in case of an emergency. 
  • Protect your property from wildfires by designing and landscaping with wildfire safety in mind. 
  • Learn about the emergency plans that have been established in your area by your state and local government. In any emergency, always listen to the instructions given by local emergency management officials.
  • Ask your local SERVPRO about starting a recovery plan for your business.

For more detailed wildfire safety tips visit FEMA's website at www.ready.gov

California & Oregon Wildfires - When Wildfire Threatens

5/14/2019 (Permalink)

Don't become a statistic.

When wildfire takes control of your life, we help you take it back.

Here are some tips from FEMA for when wildfire threatens your home or business:

  • Wear protective clothing.
  • Take your emergency supply kit.
  • Lock your home or business.
  • Tell someone when you left and where you are going. choose a route away from fire hazards.
  • Close windows, vents, doors, blinds or non-combustible window coverings.
  • Shut off all utilities if at all possible. open fireplace damper. Close fireplace screens. 
  • Move flammable furniture into center of home. 
  • Turn of a light in each room to increase visibility of your home. Seal attic and ground vents with precut noncombustible coverings. 
  • Turn off propane tanks.
  • Place combustible patio furniture inside. 
  • Connect the garden hose to outside taps. 
  • Set up portable gasoline-powered pump. Place lawn sprinklers on the roof and near above ground fuel tanks. 
  • Wet or remove shrubs within 15 feet of your home or business.
  • Gather fire tools.

What To Do Until Help Arrives: House Fire

5/13/2019 (Permalink)

We are equipped with the proper tools to remove various types of soot.

Fire & Smoke Damage

DO's:

  • Limit movement in the home to prevent soot particles from being embedded into upholstery and carpet.
  • Keep hands clean. Soot on hands can further soil upholstery, walls, and woodwork.
  • Place dry, colorfast towels or old linens on rugs, upholstery and carpet traffic areas. 
  • If electricity is off, empty freezer and refrigerator completely and prop doors open to help prevent odors. 
  • Wipe soot from chrome on kitchen and bathroom faucets, trim, and appliances, then protect these surfaces with a light coating of lubricant.
  • Wash both sides of leaves on house plants. 
  • Change HVAC filter, but leave system off until a trained professional can inspect system.
  • Tape double layers of cheesecloth over air registers to stop particles of soot from getting in or out of HVAC system.

DON'T's:

  • Attempt to wash and walls or painter surfaces without first contacting your SERVPRO Professional. 
  • Attempt to shampoo carpet or upholstered furniture without first consulting your SERVPRO Professional. 
  • Attempt to clean any electrical appliances (TV, computer, radio, tablet, etc.) that may have been close to the fire, heat, or water without first consulting an authorized repair service. 
  • Consume any food or beverages that may have been stored close to fire, heat or water. They may be contaminated.
  • Turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet. Wiring may be wet or damaged and cause electrical shock, and air movement may create secondary damage.
  • Send garments to the dry cleaner. Improper cleaning may set in smoke odor. 

Summer is Fire Season

5/4/2018 (Permalink)

Stay safe this summer with these useful tips! And remember, at SERVPRO of Coos, Curry, and Del Norte we are always here to help!

Summer is a time to enjoy the great outdoors, but it is important to also keep safety in mind.

Consider the following tips, provided by the National Fire Protection Association to keep you and your family safe all summer long.

  • When using a charcoal grill, only use starter fluids designed for barbecue grills; do not add fluid after coals are lit. 
  • When camping, always use a flame retardant tent and set up camp far away from the campfire.
  • When using a gas grill, ensure the hose connection is tight; check hoses for leaks. Applying soapy water to the hoses will easily and safely reveal any leaks. 
  • Always build a campfire down wind from the tent area. Clear vegetation and dig a pit before building your fire. Extinguish the fire before going to sleep or leaving the campsite. 
  • Store liquid fire starter away from your tent and campfire, and only use dry kindling to freshen a campfire. 

It may not be summer quite yet, but it's feeling like it! We at SERVPRO of Coos, Curry, and Del Norte Counties wish you a safe, and happy summer.

CANDLES ARE 2ND LEADING CAUSE OF HOUSE FIRES

5/4/2018 (Permalink)

Never leave a burning candle unattended!

Did you know?

From 2011-2015, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated 8,700 home structure fires that were started by candles per year. These fires caused an annual average of 82 deaths, 800 injuries and $295 million in direct property damage. 

During the five-year period of 2011-2015:

  • Candles caused 2% of reported home fires, 3% of home fire deaths, 7% of home fire injuries, and 4% of the direct property damage in home fires.
  • Roughly one-third (37%) of home candle fires started in bedrooms. These fires caused 36% of the associated deaths and 51% of the associated injuries.
  • Falling asleep was a factor in 11% percent of the home candle fires and 21% of the associated deaths.
  • On average, 24 home candle fires were reported per day. 
  • More than half (59%) of home candle fires occurred when some form of combustible material was left or came too close to the candle.
  • December is the peak time of year for home candle fires. In December, 12% of home candle fires began with decorations compared to 4% the rest of the year.

Please remember to always follow the candle fire safety guidelines also found on candles.org. You can never be too careful!

Source: NFPA "Home Candle Fires" report

Safe Outdoor Entertainment Practices

5/4/2018 (Permalink)

Summer outdoor parties are some of the best events of the year.

The warm balmy nights, food cooking on the grill, and friends and family spending quality time together in the backyard or around the pool create wonderful memories that last a lifetime. But, hosting outdoor events also means there’s an increased risk of home fires.

Fortunately, following some simple safety tips and guidelines can help ensure you and your guests stay safe. Consider the following when you host your next outdoor event: 

  • Have an adult present at all times when a portable fireplace is burning
  • Use sturdy candle holders that won’t tip over easily
  • Keep anything that can burn, as well as children and pets, at least three feet away from open flames
  • Use battery-operated flame-less candles and solar-powered patio (tiki) torches in place of an open flame. Flame-less candles come in all colors, shapes and sizes, and many are scented. Flame-less candles look and feel like the real ones, and add a beautiful soft glow to any outdoor event.

Outdoor entertaining by the numbers

  • Outside fireplaces or fire pits caused nearly 3,700 grass and brush fires
  • Total outdoor patio heater or fire pit injuries has nearly tripled in six years (1,330 to 3,608) from 2006 – 2012
  • More than half of all candle fires start when things that can burn are too close to the candle
  • An average of 8,800 home fires involved grills, hibachis, or barbecues each year
  • In 2012, sparklers, fountains and novelties accounted for 25% of emergency room fireworks-related injuries*

Source: NFPA’s Fire Analysis & Research Division *Source: Fireworks Annual Report, Consumer Product Safety Commission, 2012

Fire Escape Planning Tips

5/4/2018 (Permalink)

Your ability to get out of your home during a fire depends on advance warning from smoke alarms and advance planning.

Fire can spread rapidly through your home, leaving you as little as one or two minutes to escape safely once the smoke alarm sounds. A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room and outside each separate sleeping area. Install alarms on every level of the home. Pull together everyone in your household and make a plan. Walk through your home and inspect all possible exits and escape routes. Households with children should consider drawing a floor plan of your home, marking two ways out of each room, including windows and doors.

Escape planning tips

  • Pull together everyone in your household and make a plan. Walk through your home and inspect all possible exits and escape routes.  Households with children should consider drawing a floor plan of your home, marking two ways out of each room, including windows and doors. Also, mark the location of each smoke alarm.
  • A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home. NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm Code® requires interconnected smoke alarms throughout the home. When one sounds, they all sound.
  • When you walk through your plan, check to make sure the escape routes are clear and doors and windows can be opened easily.
  • Choose an outside meeting place (i.e. neighbor's house, a light post, mailbox, or stop sign) a safe distance in front of your home where everyone can meet after they've escaped. Make sure to mark the location of the meeting place on your escape plan.
  • Go outside to see if your street number is clearly visible from the road. If not, paint it on the curb or install house numbers to ensure that responding emergency personnel can find your home.
  • Have everyone memorize the emergency phone number of the fire department. That way any member of the household can call from a neighbor's home or a cellular phone once safely outside.
  • If there are infants, older adults, or family members with mobility limitations, make sure that someone is assigned to assist them in the fire drill and in the event of an emergency. Assign a backup person too, in case the designee is not home during the emergency
  • If windows or doors in your home have security bars, make sure that the bars have emergency release devices inside so that they can be opened immediately in an emergency. Emergency release devices won't compromise your security - but they will increase your chances of safely escaping a home fire.
  • Tell guests or visitors to your home about your family's fire escape plan. When staying overnight at other people's homes, ask about their escape plan. If they don't have a plan in place, offer to help them make one. This is especially important when children are permitted to attend "sleepovers" at friends' homes. See NFPA's "Sleepover fire safety for kids" fact sheet.
  • Be fully prepared for a real fire: when a smoke alarm sounds, get out immediately. Residents of high-rise and apartment buildings may be safer "defending in place."
  • Once you're out, stay out! Under no circumstances should you ever go back into a burning building. If someone is missing, inform the fire department dispatcher when you call. Firefighters have the skills and equipment to perform rescues.

Put your plan to the test

  • Practice your home fire escape plan twice a year, making the drill as realistic as possible.
  • Make arrangements in your plan for anyone in your home who has a disability.
  • Allow children to master fire escape planning and practice before holding a fire drill at night when they are sleeping. The objective is to practice, not to frighten, so telling children there will be a drill before they go to bed can be as effective as a surprise drill.
  • It's important to determine during the drill whether children and others can readily waken to the sound of the smoke alarm. If they fail to awaken, make sure that someone is assigned to wake them up as part of the drill and in a real emergency situation.
  • If your home has two floors, every family member (including children) must be able to escape from the second floor rooms. Escape ladders can be placed in or near windows to provide an additional escape route. Review the manufacturer's instructions carefully so you'll be able to use a safety ladder in an emergency. Practice setting up the ladder from a first floor window to make sure you can do it correctly and quickly. Children should only practice with a grown-up, and only from a first-story window. Store the ladder near the window, in an easily accessible location. You don't want to have to search for it during a fire.
  • Always choose the escape route that is safest – the one with the least amount of smoke and heat – but be prepared to escape under toxic smoke if necessary. When you do your fire drill, everyone in the family should practice getting low and going under the smoke to your exit.
  • Closing doors on your way out slows the spread of fire, giving you more time to safely escape.
  • In some cases, smoke or fire may prevent you from exiting your home or apartment building. To prepare for an emergency like this, practice "sealing yourself in for safety" as part of your home fire escape plan. Close all doors between you and the fire. Use duct tape or towels to seal the door cracks and cover air vents to keep smoke from coming in. If possible, open your windows at the top and bottom so fresh air can get in. Call the fire department to report your exact location. Wave a flashlight or light-colored cloth at the window to let the fire department know where you are located.

Coos, Curry and Del Norte County Smoke and Soot Cleanup

4/3/2018 (Permalink)

Smoke and Soot Damage Can Cause a Pervasive Odor in Your Coos, Curry or Del Norte County Home.

Smoke and soot is very invasive and can penetrate various cavities within your home, causing hidden damage and odor. Our smoke damage expertise and experience allows us to inspect and accurately assess the extent of the damage to develop a comprehensive plan of action.  

Smoke and soot facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.

Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of Coos, Curry and Del Norte Counties will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.

Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.

Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor. 

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?


Call Us Today – 
541-808-2600

Coos, Curry & Del Norte Counties Smoke and Soot Cleanup

7/27/2016 (Permalink)

Smoke and soot is very invasive and can penetrate various cavities within your home, causing hidden damage and odor. Our smoke damage expertise and experience allows us to inspect and accurately assess the extent of the damage to develop a comprehensive plan of action.  

Smoke and soot facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.
  • Different Types of Smoke

    There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of Coos, Curry& Del Norte will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

    Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.
  • Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.
  • Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor. 
  • Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

    Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

    Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
    Call Us Today – 514-808-2600